What's Next Document
  • BEST AVAILABLE RESEARCH EVIDENCE
  • EXPERIENTIAL EVIDENCE
  • CONTEXTUAL EVIDENCE
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| May 23, 2019

INTRODUCTION

This report should help you apply your new knowledge for evidence-based decision making in your prevention work. The resources listed reflect the input you provided in the Lesson Modules.

In addition, you may want to visit the Understanding Evidence Resource Center to find more resources.

LEARN MORE

The following websites may provide opportunities for learning more about Evidence-Based Decision Making:

BEST AVAILABLE RESEARCH EVIDENCE RESOURCES

Now that you have completed the Lesson Module on Best Available Research Evidence, it may be useful to know some of the resources that may help you find research evidence on prevention strategies.

Because you are an anonymous user, this report contains the resources for all of the violence types. Please register and choose a violence expertise if you would like to filter your results.

Registries of evidence-based programs are listed first, and are the best place to start to identify programs based on the best available research evidence. We recommend them as your first stop for research evidence.

Next, we recommend using technical assistance resource centers , which provide a variety of different resources for identifying prevention strategies based on the best available research evidence.

Finally, you may see some tools under “other” that provide information on risk and protective factors, emerging research evidence, and evaluation support. Not all areas of violence prevention will have tools in every category.

REGISTRIES

Youth Violence

Child Maltreatment

Sexual Violence

Intimate Partner Violence

Suicide

RESOURCE CENTERS

Youth Violence

Child Maltreatment

Sexual Violence

Intimate Partner Violence

Suicide

OTHER RESOURCES

Youth Violence

Child Maltreatment

  • Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s Cost-Effectiveness - Return on investment: Evidence-based options to improve statewide outcomes
  • Bulletin of the World Health Organization - Child maltreatment prevention: a systematic review of reviews.

Sexual Violence

  • Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s Cost-Effectiveness - Return on investment: Evidence-based options to improve statewide outcomes
  • Sexual Violence: A review of evidence for prevention from the UK focal point for violence and injury prevention.
  • Final report prepared for the US Department of Justice - An evidence- based review of sexual assault prevention intervention programs.

Intimate Partner Violence

  • Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s Cost-Effectiveness - Return on investment: Evidence-based options to improve statewide outcomes
  • Aggression and Violent Behavior - A critical review of interventions for the primary prevention of perpetration of partner violence.
  • Journal of Interpersonal Violence - Methodological review of intimate partner violence prevention research.

Suicide

  • Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s Cost-Effectiveness - Return on investment: Evidence-based options to improve statewide outcomes
  • Suicide prevention strategies: A systematic review. Journal of the American Medical Association

BEST AVAILABLE RESEARCH EVIDENCE RESOURCES

Databases of research articles are another source of research evidence. In the Lesson Module, you answered a question about your comfort level with searching for best available research evidence in these article databases. Based on your answers, you may find the following helpful.

The following resources may be helpful to learn more about how to partner with researchers and strengthen the research evidence related to a strategy you currently implement.

BEST AVAILABLE RESEARCH EVIDENCE RESOURCES

Also, the resources listed below may be helpful for evaluating and improving a strategy you currently implement.

CONTEXTUAL INFLUENCE

You listed the following as influential contextual factors in making decisions about using prevention programs, practices or policies in your organization:

CONTEXTUAL EVIDENCE RESOURCES COMMUNITY FACTORS

The Lesson Module on Contextual Evidence introduced several community characteristics on which you might collect information. When this information is systematically collected, replicable, observable, credible, verifiable, and, finally, relevant to program implementation, it may be considered contextual evidence.

You identified the following factors as relevant to your prevention decision. Below are specific questions that gathering information on each of these factors may answer in your decision making process.

FACTORS

CHARACTERISTICS

FINDING AND COLLECTING CONTEXTUAL EVIDENCE

There are several places to find and ways to collect contextual evidence. The methods and sources you indicated you would like to know more about are listed below, along with resources for finding or identifying this data.

FINDING AND COLLECTING CONTEXTUAL EVIDENCE

EXPERIENTIAL INFLUENCE

You also listed the following as influential experiential factors in making decisions about using prevention programs, practices or policies in your organization:

EXPERIENTIAL EVIDENCE RESOURCES

The Lesson Module introduced several sources for collecting experiential evidence. You were asked to identify the ways you have collected experiential evidence in the past. The following are some additional techniques for collecting experiential evidence that you did not select and may find useful to learn more about.

COLLECTING EXPERIENTIAL EVIDENCE

SKILLS RESOURCES

According to your input during the lesson module, you may be interested in learning more about the following skills. You may find the links below each skill useful.